Academic Admission

  Admission Require Master of Arts

Responsibility for admission decisions is vested in the Graduate Admissions Committee (GAC). All applicants seeking admission into a M.A. program must first meet the general admissions standard of and be admitted into the University. In addition to the general requirements for admission to the University, applicants for M.A. degree programs must also meet the following requirements.

Undergraduate preparation for the M.A. Degree:

  1. Completion of a bachelor’s degree from a college or university accredited by an accrediting agency recognized by the S. Department of Education, from an institution approved by the Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education or from a national or international institution that meets these standards.
  2. A cumulative grade point average of 5 or higher (on a four-point scale) in all baccalaureate work.

Based on individual merit, at the discretion of the GAC, an applicant whose grade point average is below 2.5 may be admitted into the program on a provisional status — requiring the applicant to complete the first 12 credit hours of graduate level courses with grades of “B” or above before receiving further consideration for regular standing in a M.A. degree program.

MA PROGRAM GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

A candidate for the Master of Arts Degree shall have:

  1. Successfully completed an approved A. program with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or better, while having received no more than two (2) letter grades of less than a B or two grades of B-, C+, or C.
  2. Successfully completed either the integrative seminar, field education, thesis/or project
  3. Filed all the necessary graduation forms in accordance with the timetable provided by the School of Theological Studies.
  4. Successfully completed all degree requirements within the maximum time limit allowed six (6) years, or within an officially approved time
  5. Settled all financial obligations to the

Credit Hour Requirements the M.A. degree requires a minimum of 96 credit hours of graduate course work. Students may receive a maximum of six (6) credit hours for completion of EO 715, Field Education and RM 710; EO 716, Integrative Seminar and RM 710; EO 717, Project Option and RM 710 and EO 718, Thesis Option and RM 710.

Provisional Standing

If a student meets the entrance requirements of the University and the requirement for admission to a particular program, but has only unofficial transcripts on file because official transcripts are not immediately available, he/she may be admitted to the program as a Provisional Standing student to provide time for receipt of official transcripts. If the Office of Admissions and Records does not receive the documentation within one (1) quarter, the student will be prohibited from undertaking further coursework until official documents are received. When the Office of Admissions and Records receives the official records, the student will be eligible to be reclassified as a Regular Standing student.

Coursework completed satisfactorily while on Provisional Standing counts towards graduation, if it meets a program’s requirements. Special Standing (Non-Matriculated) ─ Students who satisfy the entry requirements for a particular program and the course prerequisites for a particular course, who do not plan to earn a degree but want to officially take selected courses, may be granted Special Standing status in the program. Such students must successfully petition the course’s instructor and have his/her approval prior to registration in a course. All such petitions will be considered on a space available basis.

Auditor ─ Students who wish to attend classes for personal enrichment and not for academic credit may be granted Auditors’ status. Auditors are not obligated to actively participate in coursework or course activities. However, an Auditor must qualify as a Regular Standing student to audit courses in a degree program, as well as meet any course prerequisite or requisite requirements. Students who wish to audit a course must first gain the instructor’s approval. An abbreviated admission process is available for auditors, who are admitted to courses on a space available basis.

Ability-to Benefit, Prior Experiential Learning, Challenge Exams, and Achievement Tests

  • WCU does not acknowledge Ability-to-Benefit policy, student’s prior experiential learning, challenge exams or achievement tests.
  • WCU has not entered into an articulation or transfer agreement with any other college or university.

  Admission Require Bachelor

Responsibility for admission decisions is vested in the Graduate Admissions Committee (GAC). All applicants seeking admission into a Bachelor program must first meet the general admissions standard of and be admitted into the University. In addition to the general requirements for admission to the University, applicants for B.A and B.S. degree programs must also meet the following requirements.

Graduate preparation for the B.A. and B.S. Degree:

  1. Completion of a bachelor’s degree from a college or university accredited by an accrediting agency recognized by the S. Department of Education, from an institution approved by the Bureau for Private Postsecondary Education or from a national or international institution that meets these standards.
  2. A cumulative grade point average of 5 or higher (on a four-point scale) in all baccalaureate work.

Based on individual merit, at the discretion of the GAC, an applicant whose grade point average is below 2.5 may be admitted into the program on a provisional status — requiring the applicant to complete the first 12 credit hours of graduate level courses with grades of “B” or above before receiving further consideration for regular standing in a B.A. and B.S. degree program.

BACHELOR`S PROGRAM GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

A candidate for the Bachelor of Arts and Science Degree shall have:

  1. Successfully completed an approved A. program with a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or better, while having received no more than two (2) letter grades of less than a B or two grades of B-, C+, or C.
  2. Successfully completed either the integrative seminar, field education, thesis/or project
  3. Filed all the necessary graduation forms in accordance with the timetable provided by the School of Business Administration or Computer Science Studies.
  4. Successfully completed all degree requirements within the maximum time limit allowed six (10) years, or within an officially approved time
  5. Settled all financial obligations to the

Credit Hour Requirements the B.A. and B.S. degree requires a minimum of 180 credit hours of graduate course work. Students may receive a maximum of ten (10) credit hours for completion of EO 515, Field Education and RM 510; EO 516, Integrative Seminar and RM 510; EO 517, Project Option and RM 510 and EO 518, Thesis Option and RM 510.

Provisional Standing

If a student meets the entrance requirements of the University and the requirement for admission to a particular program, but has only unofficial transcripts on file because official transcripts are not immediately available, he/she may be admitted to the program as a Provisional Standing student to provide time for receipt of official transcripts. If the Office of Admissions and Records does not receive the documentation within one (1) quarter, the student will be prohibited from undertaking further coursework until official documents are received. When the Office of Admissions and Records receives the official records, the student will be eligible to be reclassified as a Regular Standing student.

Coursework completed satisfactorily while on Provisional Standing counts towards graduation, if it meets a program’s requirements. Special Standing (Non-Matriculated) ─ Students who satisfy the entry requirements for a particular program and the course prerequisites for a particular course, who do not plan to earn a degree but want to officially take selected courses, may be granted Special Standing status in the program. Such students must successfully petition the course’s instructor and have his/her approval prior to registration in a course. All such petitions will be considered on a space available basis.

Auditor ─ Students who wish to attend classes for personal enrichment and not for academic credit may be granted Auditors’ status. Auditors are not obligated to actively participate in coursework or course activities. However, an Auditor must qualify as a Regular Standing student to audit courses in a degree program, as well as meet any course prerequisite or requisite requirements. Students who wish to audit a course must first gain the instructor’s approval. An abbreviated admission process is available for auditors, who are admitted to courses on a space available basis.

Ability-to Benefit, Prior Experiential Learning, Challenge Exams, and Achievement Tests

  • WCU does not acknowledge Ability-to-Benefit policy, student’s prior experiential learning, challenge exams or achievement tests.
  • WCU has not entered into an articulation or transfer agreement with any other college or university.

  Admission Require Certificate

GUIDELINES FOR CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

These guidelines are intended to increase uniformity at WCU in the use of the terms for certificate programs and related non-degree programs and to set guidelines for the development and management of most rigorous of these offerings, academic certificate programs. Three broad types of programs are distinguished: (1) workshops and short courses; (2) non-academic credit certificate programs; and (3) academic certificate programs. Any exceptions to these categories or policies should be approved through the Office of the Provost.

These guidelines also apply to programs that are offered through, or in partnership with, a third party. The use of WCU’s name, wordmarks, and/or seal in publicity, marketing, or any documents or communications is limited to programs that have been approved by the Office of the Provost and include the continued involvement of WCU faculty and ongoing oversight by the appropriate academic school and department. Such use must also adhere to the University’s branding standards, as defined by the Division of External Relations.

Attributes of Certificate and Non-degree Programs
  • Workshops and short courses are not considered certificate programs. They do not carry academic credit and typically involve 20 or fewer contact hours. While a document may be produced and distributed to acknowledge participation in these types of activities, it must only acknowledge the student’s attendance and involvement and cannot be considered a formal recognition of accomplishment. The document does not represent proof of completion of a certificate program, an evaluation of the student’s level of performance during the program, or a certification of attainment of any specific level of knowledge or competence. No official record of this documentation of students’ participation is maintained by the Registrar’s Office. Documents presented to students completing these workshops or short courses must not resemble a WCU diploma, include the WCU seal, bear a WCU graduation date, resemble a WCU diploma, or contain the words “certificate” or “diploma.” These may be called an “Acknowledgment of Participation” or “Confirmation of Participation.”
  • Non-academic credit certificate programs are generally professional development programs and often involve the awarding of a certificate of completion and continuing education units (CEUs). All new non-academic credit certificate programs must be approved by the department and school or college and reported to the Associate Provost for Academic Planning and Assessment. Admissions requirements and standards may vary by program. No academic credit will be awarded for these programs. No academic record or enrollment verification will be maintained by the Registrar’s office; instead, records of course work taken and program completion must be maintained by the offering school or department. Documents (e.g., a “Certificate of Completion”) may be issued to provide an assessment of competence, a record of course work taken, or confirmation of program completion. However, these documents cannot carry the GW seal, bear a GW graduation date, resemble a WCU diploma, or contain the word “diploma.” While these programs may be rigorous and require a substantial investment of time, they, unlike academic certificate programs, generally do not articulate into a degree program. Students enrolled in non-academic credit certificate programs must be informed that the Registrar’s office does not maintain any records of course work taken and that students who complete the program are not considered alumni. Regular active status faculty who teach in a non-academic credit certificate program must be paid in the form of supplemental compensation. Departments may not use C-funds to pay faculty salaries. Moreover, teaching in these programs may not count as part of a faculty member’s academic teaching load.
  • Academic certificate programs provide substantial education at either the graduate or undergraduate level. The programs center on a coherent and relatively free-standing body of knowledge and skills, and their completion, therefore, represents the achievement of competence in a well-defined domain. Records of course work and program completion must be maintained by the Registrar’s Office and show on the student’s official WCU transcript. The certificate document is issued by the Registrar’s Office. An academic certificate program can be a: free-standing program that bears little resemblance to existing degree programs (for example, a new interdisciplinary program or an attempt to test the market to determine whether a new degree program will succeed); subset of courses offered as part of an existing curriculum for a degree program; and/or credential for students who elect not to finish a degree in which they enrolled.
Curriculum Requirements for Academic Certificate Programs

There are four general categories of academic certificate programs at WCU: undergraduate, post-baccalaureate, graduate, and post-master’s.  The curriculum requirements for both the undergraduate and post-baccalaureate certificate programs include undergraduate-level course work. The difference between the two programs is in admissions requirements: the post-baccalaureate certificate program requires an undergraduate degree from an accredited institution as a prerequisite for admission, while the undergraduate certificate requires only a high school diploma or equivalent.

Graduate and post-master’s certificate programs are composed of graduate-level course work. Applicants to graduate certificate programs must have successfully completed an undergraduate degree prior to admission; post-master’s certificate programs require successful completion of a master’s degree prior to admission. Academic certificate programs must include a minimum of 12 credit hours and more typically require 15 or 18 hours. The content, methodology, and workload for all courses applied toward the program must be clearly defined and appropriate for the level and amount of credit awarded. Because of the small number of courses included in a certificate, these programs should not have concentrations associated with them.

Administration of Certificate Programs

Each certificate program must have a designated program director who is responsible for administering the program (including keeping the school and the Associate Provost for Academic Planning and Assessment fully informed of any changes in the program) and meeting the needs of its students. Involvement of school-level admissions and student services staff may be less in many certificate programs than in degree programs. This puts a greater than usual burden on departmental staff to ensure that admissions criteria and processes are fair, that students are treated properly, and that school and University standards are upheld.

Approval and Review
As with degree programs, all new certificate programs, as well as changes to existing certificate programs, must be approved by the appropriate department(s), Dean, and the Associate Provost for Academic Planning and Assessment prior to public announcement of the program, acceptance of applications, or student enrollment in the program. Approval by the Board of Trustees is not required. After school review processes are complete, a Master Program Data form (and Master Course Data forms for any new courses) must be submitted to the office of the Associate Provost for Academic Planning and Assessment for approval. As with all Master Program Data Forms, the justification for the program, admissions criteria, learning outcomes, and curricular requirements must be clearly articulated.

Certificate programs should be reviewed periodically to ensure that they are maintaining high standards of quality and contributing to the good of the department, school, or college, and University. The programs are included in the academic program review of the department or program every five years. In addition, it is the responsibility of the schools to monitor new certificate programs during their first four years and to initiate procedures to phase out or terminate programs that do not meet standards of quality or are not financially viable.

An inventory of all certificate programs is maintained by the Office of Academic Planning and Assessment; the Registrar’s Office and Institutional Research have authoritative lists of all academic programs; and the Office of Student Financial Assistance maintains list of all certificate programs that have been approved for Federal financial aid.

 

  Extension Programs Require

A Extension Programs shall have: Coming Soon